Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
you do instead of dealing with the policy issues. we have have a very distinguished member with us, a good friend of all of us, someone who deals seriously with policy issues and is joined us today and that would be january from illinois. >> also i think today of most significance i believe is my role on the intelligence committee. all of us were given a briefing based on emerging information from the intelligence committee . susan rice, i do -- susan rice went on television based on the information that was available at the time and the briefing that she was given information and intelligence that she had no part in collecting. the kind of statement that is anyone who had been given those briefings would have made in public. obviously, this was on an unclassified buys sis but she was given information that she had that has subsequently been updated. it was not wrong or deliberately misleading in any way. there had been the belief that there had been a protest that developed into this attack. so susan rice as the president very clearly said, if anyone has a problem with the intelli
, we thank you for that support. without which we couldn't do this program. it's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning, the chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days has been a little bit distracted. new jersey took the brunt of the storm. i grew up in louisiana. we are sort of used to this sort of thing, but we don't usually have hurricanes that have a wind chill and snowfall associated with them. which complicates matters. i hope everyone's all right up there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where are the military services going? it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army back during not the last draw down but the one before that. the one after vietnam. those of you who have been coming to our events know we have been talking about draw downs for some time now. eventually it had to get here and we are now at the cusp of one. we don't know how long, far, or deep. but there are a lot of lessons from the past th
find -- i am an eternal. i used to be a reporter. it is a combination of writing and editing from my vantage point. >> did you both deal with the editor and publisher? >> yes. >> thanks a lot. that is three interesting. >> one of my favorite parts of the book is petraeus is the dominant character and we have great access to him and it is told from his point of view but we established a group of secondary characters. three of them were the tenet commanders who were commanding combat battalions so we tell the story of their war. one fodder on kandahar, one in the mountains of eastern afghanistan, and gazni province and they all intersected with petraeus. the fourth secondary character is here, doug oliphant. we have one of the lieutenant colonels here. the general's aid in bosnia? he was his aide during the invasion of iraq. harry was back in afghanistan -- and here he was back in afghanistan. it was the first time -- petraeus has a special relationship with the 101st because he commanded them in the invasion of iraq. it was his first combat command. it so happened that the 101st was i
and the press. if i use the word twilight to suggest that network news, as we have known it, is on its way out and as something new is emerging. whether what is new will satisfy the urgent needs of our democracy cannot be noted at this time. let's hope that it will. without a free and occasionally rambunctious media, we will not be living in an open society. the free press and an open society are intimately linked, one dependent on the other. network news -- if network news is in its twilight, then perhaps our democracy is facing a turning point as well. i asked an old colleague and a friend, ted koppel, to discuss the changes in network news and what those changes might mean for our society. ted is known best for his 25 years of anchor and host of nightline, but he has also been a foreign correspondent, a war correspondent, and author, and he has covered many political campaigns. i shared something in preparing with this -- for this program. i ran into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more th
, broadcast news has been outflanked and overtaken by scores of other media options. help us understand the perceived need for these changes because they not only affect the quality of network news, by the way, do you agree with me that it is in the twilight zone a? >> it is in a twilight. but remember, twilight is usually followed by night and then don follows night. i am still hopeful. you know, it is not going to stay this way forever. i think, you know, what tends to happen in this country as you and i have observed over the last 50 or 60 years, we tend to go too far to the right, and then we correct course and passed through the middle and go too far to the left, and then we correct course again i think what is happening to broadcast journalism requires a course correction. as we come to realize that our educational system is not as good as we like to believe, that our health care system is not as good as we like to believe, that we are spending -- i mean, there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us into real disaster. not the least of them being the possibility of
. this is the last, number three, and ate plice to all of us here tonight. after this last debate i asked myself one simple question and i'll ask you that question tonight. who do we trust as parents and grandparents to protect our sons and daughters when their sent to foreign lands to protect our country? my answer, mitt romney. [applause] and this is my final message to our president currently, barack obama if you're a country music fan you may recognize the lyrics. you don't have to go home, but you can't stay here. [applause] so please welcome our next speaker, the governor of the great state of ohio. [applause] >> do you like what's going on in ohio? we're growing jobs and helping families. well let me tell you what we're doing in mow hoe is what mitt romney is going to do in jashjash and get this country back on track again. [applause] it's really faith ladies and gentlemen and boys and girls, and by the way i've never seen so many young people at campaign rallies. and i'll tell you what i think it's all about. we as americans recognize we have two pathes to choose. we've seen what the last fo
.8%, the unemployment rate, from september. showing 171,000 jobs added in october, this according to the u.s. bureau of labor statistics this morning. i want to get your quick reaction to those numbers. guest: first of all, that is virtually no change. yes, it is an uptick, and it was down the month before. but unemployment is staying basically around 8%. if you count the people of -- who have given up looking for jobs in this country, we have over 20 million people who are unemployed right now. we have to address their needs and concerns, and make sure they have jobs over the next four years. by producing 12 million jobs, a lot of these people will be put back to work. if we continue the policies of the last four years, i am afraid we will see the next norm for unemployment in this country will be 8%, and the unemployment figures are going to stay around that 20 million figure. i think we can do a lot better. i think governor romney certainly has a program to do that, he and certainly in ohio we have proven that it can be done. host: let us go to judith, on the democratic line. you are on. caller:
you for joining us. that is all for "washington journal" today. we will see u.s. 7:00 a.m. eastern tomorrow. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> president obama and republican mitt romney will be focused on ohio today, one day before election day. it will both be in columbus. president obama will start the day keeping me in madison, wisconsin. -- it will both be in columbus. mr. romney has four campaign stops today. manchester, new hampshire tonight. we are pleased to cover his million shares bought. c-span asked reporters and political analyst what they're watching for on election night, both on the national and state level. here is what they had to say. >> you always watched the first votes that, in. it varies from year to year. i have done this for decades and i care to remind you of. they come in different places. you have to know the history, county, to interpret the results. once we get a sizable lover of boats and, i will look at the critical counties in north virginia. i will look up to chesterf
is more republican than it used to be. that's why before the election republicans were saying mitt romney was winning the independents he's going to win, that wasn't the case because the independents are already a republican group. host: from the 2008 elections when obama won 52% to john mcwane's 44% of those who identified themselves as independents. these candidates were trying to reach those independents out there but you're saying not all the independents are truly independents? guest: when people identify as independent they mean a lot of different things. some people mean i go back and forth, that's one group. other people mean i kstly vote for one party or the other but i don't think of myself as a member of that party. and so you really have to distinguish between how people identify themselves which is one thing and how people vote which is not necessarily the same thing. host: a couple of calls for you on the democratic line. caller: good morning. i just want to comment on the latino vote. i know you had a guest before and we could relate on. this a couple of points basically. h
best do that in the u.s. senate right now? i thought about that with my wife and children, and they have been such wonderful supporters, and i realize there is a gridlock. we cannot allow it to continue. we cannot have the nation we want if senate and congress is gridlock. i decided my experience as a tough times mayor and governor were an experience i could bring to the table to make good things happened in partnership with others. that was 19 months ago. we have trouble more than 60,000 miles. we have recruited more than 50,000 donors, including a deer i hit and killed, so we gave up a windshield process required and in the process. this campaign has taught me now more than ever we need people who know how to be partners rather than just partisans. we are americans but virginians furs. i learn this when i was the mayor. we knew who the democrats and republicans were. we were bipartisan. as a mayor, we were able to build schools common on -- to build schools, to cut crime, to clean up the river, and we did it by working together. as governor, you get a four-year term. min
the executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles. he was the first chief of the u.s. office of citizenship, appointed by president george w. bush. alfonso is responsible for developing initiatives and programs to educate immigrants about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and encourage their integration into american civic culture. brad bailey is the founder and ceo of texas immigration solutions. to 2011, he was the order of houston-area -- owner of houst on-area restaurants. his group seeks to develop conservative solutions to immigration policy but he served on the 2012 platform committee of the republican party of texas. richard land is the president of the southern baptist convention's official added to address social, moral, and ethical concerns, with a particular attention to impact on american families and their faith. he is also the editor of a national magazine dedicated to coverage of traditional religious values, christian ethics, and cultural trends. last but not least, my friend ramesh ponnuru, senior editor for "national review" magazine an
the united states has -- enforces policies on other countries. if the states and the u.s. were to go to legalization, are we going to get ourselves but the trouble with any international organization or treaties we have signed? >> i did not know much about the treaty arrangement that the regulation drug distribution but i did read an interesting article that said the greatest loser when it came to the legalization of marijuana in the state's where the drug growers in mexico. that is not a treaty arrangement but obviously an economic arrangement that may have some political ramifications beyond just drugs. >> the prohibition counterpart to that, i enormous amount of liquor came in from the u.k. directly to the bahamas. nasa was a town of 700 people before prohibition -- nassau was a town of 700 people before prohibition di. the colonial secretary of the u.k. at that time was winston churchill. we can imagine what he thought about prohibition. he called that a front to the entire history of mankind. . >> if you could talk a little bit about the importance of studying constitutional his
any further. >> let's go to this part of the room. let's go here. >> u.s. news and world report. it seems the coalition was unable biunique elements of this election. he have the bain background. how will they try to recreate the coalition? >> great question. a year ago, i would have said -- he ran poorly among blue collar and older whites. even with paul ryan on the ticket, a 60% of seniors voted for romney. in the long run, i think those red states are problematic for democrats. look at north carolina. in north carolina or virginia, obama's numbers among blue- collar whites are unbelievably low. they are in the high-20's or 30's. in the long run, i do think there is this pattern. the sun belt will be more important than the west about. they do have the incredible ability to hang on to -- the shift will be to states that have the same social forces of rising diversity and rising education levels. >> we have a slight disagreement. obama did well among these groups in 2008. democrats do well among white blue-collar voters in the midwest. there are union presidents and other thing
much. everybody, please have a seat. thank you. good afternoon, everybody. now that those of us on the campaign trail have had a chance to get a little sleep, it is time to get back to work, and there's plenty of work to do. as i said on tuesday night, the american people voted for action, not politics as usual. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. in that spirit, i have invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. i also intend to bring in business and labor and civic leaders from all across the country to get their ideas as well. in a time when our economy is still recovering from the great recession, our top priority has to be jobs and growth. that is the focus of the plan that i talked about during the campaign. [applause] it is a plan to reward small businesses and manufacturers to create jobs here, not overseas, a plan to give people the chance to get the education and training that businesses are looking for right now. it is a plan to make sure this country
? in an earlier exchange of the phrase was used -- if republicans are talking about tax increases -- actually, republicans are talking about tax increases. calling it revenue increases as part of the deal. plenty of republican members of congress are scrambling are looking for ways to tinker with things are then marginal tax rates. i will name three specific members who have talked about it or something very much to like it, all who signed the pledge. bob corker, tom coburn, and john mccain. what is going on? it certainly looks to a layman that there is a desperate scramble to find a way to raise revenue in a cbo-scoring way that would not be seen as violating the pledge. the question is, is the pledge of losing its magic? >> i take very strong exception to taking this poll seriously. because if you ask people, the vast majority of whom are not going to be subjected to this tax, and they are being told that somebody else will have to pay. and if you discover in the process that only 60% of the voters are in favor of that, i think it speaks for itself and speaks very well of the american peopl
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)